Resources

     What were you doing on December 28, 1986?   Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten wants to hear from you. His next book, “One Day,” will explore an ordinary day in the history of the United States, chosen at random by drawing numbers from a hat. That’s the date he got; it was the Sunday between Christmas and New Year’s.
     Weingarten has collected plenty of items large and small that that made national or local news that day, but he would also love to hear what was important in your life at that time. What did you write in your diary? Your scrapbook? What photos have you held onto? He is looking for things that are poignant or revealing or even things seemingly banal or mundane that might later have proved significant to your life, or predictive of things that might follow. If any memories surface that you’d like to share, please pass them along to .   Make the subject line “Dec. 28″   All emails will be treated confidentially, and he will respond to each.  By writing to him, you are not offering your experience for publication; anything he uses will be with your permission only.
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City Hill Publishing, a small press from Rancho Cordova, is seeking submissions from new and established authors for an anthology of non-fiction/memoir essays. The anthology is entitled From the Bleachers and will focus on significant professional, sports events or figures from the perspectives of the fans. Any major, professional sports event or figure is acceptable. The memoir/essays must be well-written and emotionally impactful, discussing important moments that, in retrospect, held a special place in the writer’s heart. For example, how a sports moment enhanced a relationship with a loved one, how the event/figure itself came at a powerful time in one’s life, how an event/figure created community among a certain group, how an event/figure increased your love of the game, etc. Each essay/memoir must be centered around a professional sports event/figure and be personal and positive.

Please submit only one entry per person. Submissions must be no more than 3,000 words and double-spaced in an easily readable font and attached as a Word doc. or PDF. Be sure to place a header with your name, title, and page number to the document. Include a cover letter with your name, address, phone number, email, and title of entry.

HOW TO SUBMIT

EMAIL:

Send submissions to . In the subject line, write “SUBMISSION” along with your name. Attach a PDF or Word document along with the email. In the body of the email, please include the cover letter information.

MAIL:

Send manuscript to:

City Hill Publishing
2941 Sunrise Blvd Suite 270
Rancho Cordova, CA 95742

Please provide a SASE for a reply and if you want your manuscript returned.

Work accepted for publication will receive two complimentary copies. By allowing us to publish your work, we reserve first publication rights and may be reprinted with permission from City Hill Publishing. Simultaneous submissions are welcome but please notify us if the piece is chosen elsewhere.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS OCTOBER 31, 2013 by MIDNIGHT

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Advice from John Steinbeck

Here’s a quote we like from John Steinbeck to a friend who asked him for rudimentary suggestions for the beginner. It may be all you need to get you started with your memoir:

“Don’t start by trying to make the book chronological. Just take a period. Then try to remember it so clearly that you can see things: what colors and how warm or cold and how you got there. Then try to remember people. And then just tell what happened. It is important to tell what people looked like, how they walked, what they wore, what they ate. Put it all in. Don’t try to organize it. And put in all the details you can remember. You will find that in a very short time things will begin coming back to you, you thought you had forgotten. Do it for very short periods at first but kind of think of it when you aren’t doing it. Don’t think back over what you have done. Don’t think of literary form. Let it get out as it wants to. Over tell it in the matter of detail — cutting comes later. The form will develop in the telling.”